Ficus carica is an Asian species of flowering plant in the mulberry family, known as the common fig. It is the source of the fruit also called the fig and as such is an important crop in those areas where it is grown commercially. Native to the Middle East and western Asia, it has been sought out and cultivated since ancient times and is now widely grown throughout the world, both for its fruit and as an ornamental plant. The species has become naturalized in scattered locations in Asia and North America.
The word fig, first recorded in English in the 13th century, derives from French figue, itself from Occitan figa, from Romance fica, from Classical Latin ficus.  Italian has fico, directly derived from Latin ficus. The name of the caprifig, Ficus caprificus Risso, is derived both from Latin capro and English fig.
The common fig tree has been cultivated since ancient times and grows wild in dry and sunny locations with deep and fresh soil, and in rocky locations that are at sea level to 1,700 metres in elevation. It prefers relatively porous and freely draining soil, and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Unlike other fig species, Ficus carica does not always require pollination by a wasp or from another tree, because the fig wasp, Blastophaga psenes can pollinate it so as to produce seeds. Fig wasps are not present to pollinate in colder nations, e. g. the United Kingdom.
The plant tolerates seasonal drought, and the Middle Eastern and Mediterranean climates are especially suitable to it. Situated in a favorable habitat, mature specimens can grow to considerable size as large, dense, shade trees. Its aggressive root system precludes its cultivation in many urban locations, yet in nature this characteristic helps the plant to root in the most inhospitable locations. Having a great need of water, it is mostly a phreatophyte that extracts the needed water from sources in or on the ground. Consequently, it frequently grows in locations with standing or running water, e. g. in valleys of rivers and in ravines that collect water.
Ficus carica is an Asian species of flowering plant in the mulberry family, known as the common fig. It is the source of the fruit also called the fig and as such is an important crop in those areas where it is grown commercially. Native to the Middle East and western Asia, it has been sought out and cultivated since ancient times and is now widely grown throughout the world, both for its fruit and as an ornamental plant. The species has become naturalized in scattered locations in Asia and North America.
فنقی ها و یونانی ها از جمله اقوامی هستند که می توان آن ها را عامل کشت و توسعه انجیر دانست و احتمالا اولین مکانی که انجیر از حوزه مدیترانه به آنجا برده شده است یونان می باشد و از یونان به ایتالیا و از ایتالیا به فرانسه، آفریقا و قسمت هایی از جنوب انگلیس و توسط اعراب به پرتغال و اسپانیا برده شده است.
در ایران، علیرغم وجود واریته های مختلف انجیر، هنوز مدارکی دال بر کشت انجیر تا پیش از قرن چهاردهم میلادی به دست نیامده است.
تاکنون نزدیک به 1000 واریته انجیر در جهان شناخته شده است و هم اکنون انجیر در پنج قاره جهان جهت مصرف داخلی یا به عنوان یک محصول صادراتی کشت و پرورش داده می شود و یکی از میوه های مهم نزد مردم آسیای غربی و نواحی شرقی مدیترانه در تمدن های اولیه بوده است.
این محصول در نواحی گرمسیری و نیمه گرمسیری و در بسیاری از مناطق معتدله کشت می شود. بیشترین سطح زیر کشت انجیر در نواحی حوزه مدیترانه، دریای سرخ و خلیج فارس می باشد.
The plant tolerates seasonal drought, and the Middle Eastern and Mediterranean climates are especially suitable to it. Situated in a favorable habitat, mature specimens can grow to considerable size as large, dense, shade trees. Its aggressive root system precludes its cultivation in many urban locations, yet in nature this characteristic helps the plant to root in the most inhospitable locations. Having a great need of water, it is mostly a phreatophyte that extracts the needed water from sources in or on the ground. Consequently, it frequently grows in locations with standing or running water, e. g. in valleys of rivers and in ravines that collect water.

Antioxidant Activities and Anthocyanin Content of Fresh Fruits of Common Fig

Fig has been a typical component in the health-promoting Mediterranean diet for millennia. To study the potential health-promoting constituents of fig , six commercial fig varieties differing in color were analyzed for total polyphenols, total flavonoids, antioxidant capacity

Aflatoxigenic fungi and aflatoxins occurrence in sultanas and dried figs commercialized in Brazil

The presence of aflatoxins, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus in dried fruits was investigated. A total of 62 dried fruit sam- ples were analyzed (24 black sultanas, 19 white sultanas and 19 dried figs)